You can prove anything with statistics!

It may be that I’ve had numbers on my mind, but recently everywhere I go I’ve come across statistics. From the episode of ‘Yes Primeminister’ I watched the other night to a meeting on Friday where I was casually asked how many hits Quebecs introduction video I’d uploaded a weeks ago had now. Through to reading about culture24 starting research into how museums measure success online.

It got me thinking as to how useful statistics actually are in relation to a Heritage/Museum Youtube channel and what they can prove. Certainly Youtube is excellent if you want to find out information about how many people have been looking at your video (108 so far). Just look at the some of the insight information for the Quebec video below!

Insight information from Youtube

It makes for an interesting read; it tells me where hits have came from and it tells me the video is most popular with 13-17 year old males. It tells me where hits have came from and it also tells me where in the world people who watch the video are from (hits from Canada, USA, Finland and even Saudi Arabia!).However it won’t tell me how many of these people will then go and visit Quebec House and chances are I will probably never know.  Arguably people from around the world will probably never visit Quebec House after seeing a video on Youtube. This got me thinking, I wonder if this is the only measure of success?Other factors can also be used to judge success. Virtual visit themselves are important; they expand access to audiences who may not have the ability to travel to a place to see it in reality. So in these terms virtual visits from places like Saudi Arabia and Canada are a success in themselves. 

You can prove anything with statistics, but how should we measure success? Should it be a numbers game or should other measures be used?

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1 Comment

Filed under Social Media, statistics, Youtube

One response to “You can prove anything with statistics!

  1. Sophie Chessum

    A visit is a visit, virtual or physical in my opinion…But we (the National Trust) should make sure that we apply the same kinds of standards to all visits. A virtual visit causes no wear and tear and therefore no cost, but equally it is not generating income by buying a cup of tea, though it’s possible to buy a guidebook or download a PDF. It would be really nice to think that some of your 13-17 year old male hits might dream of visiting Quebec House, and achieve it when they’re a bit older!

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